Umbilical Cord Stem Cells in Costa Rica

The Stem Cells Transplant Institute in Costa Rica Now Offers Umbilical Cord Stem Cells

Stem cell therapy, in combination with growth factors and antioxidants, has been shown in clinical trials to be one of the best therapeutic options for a number of diseases including but not limited to: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, burns, erectile dysfunction, and COPD as well as a natural method to fight other signs and symptoms of aging.  Stem cell therapy improves cell regeneration and aids in tissue healing and repair.
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Rotator Cuff Stem Cells Therapy

Can Stem Cell Therapy Heal Shoulder Injuries?

A rotator cuff injury is a common accounting for nearly 4 million visits to the doctor in the United States. The shoulder joint is one of the most powerful joints in your body but is necessary for even the smallest everyday activity such as combing your hair. Injury to a should significantly impact a person’s quality of life, making it difficult to perform even simple tasks and causing pain and discomfort.
Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.
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Stem Cell Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Stem Cell Therapy: A Safer and More Effective Treatment Option for Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating, degenerative joint disease, associated with aging, that affects mainly the articular cartilage and is caused by chronic wear and tear, or injury to the cartilage. Osteoarthritis can occur in one joint or multiple joints and most commonly occurs in the knees, hips, fingers and lower spine region. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in the United States affecting approximately 27 million Americans.
Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.
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erectile dysfunction stem cells treatment

Erectile Dysfunction May Have a Genetic Link

Scientists, at Kaiser Permanente in California, may have discovered a genetic risk factor for erectile dysfunction. Risk factors such as drinking, smoking and obesity are still risk factors, however, for many men, losing weight and quitting smoking and drinking does not resolve the problem. Finding a genetic link may help scientists identify new treatment options.
Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.
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depression and lupus risk stem cells theraphy

Can Depression Increase the Risk of Developing Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)?

In a 20-year study of more than 194,000 women, researchers found women with a history of depression have a 2-fold increased risk of developing SLE when compared to women with no history of depression.  Systemic lupus erythematosus is a systemic autoimmune disease that occurs when your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks your healthy tissue and organs. Inflammation caused by SLE can affect your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs. The Stem Cells Transplant Institute uses adult mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of SLE.
Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.
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diabetes signs stem cells treatment

When do Patients Show Signs of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a global health problem affecting an estimated 346 million people worldwide and a leading cause of death. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes.
Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.
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A Healthy Diet May Lower the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers in Australia have found a healthy diet consisting of vegetables, fish, legumes, eggs, and poultry may lower the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is a chronic, immune-mediated disease, where the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue in the central nervous system (brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves).
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COPD: A Significant Cause of Morbidity and Mortality

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been related to a number of morbidities such as pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, lung cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and psychological disorders, however, the association of these comorbidities and COPD is not well understood. There has been a lot of variability in the reported prevalence for these comorbidities additionally, smoking is a risk factor for COPD and many of the associated comorbidities, making it difficult to for physicians to understand the relationship between COPD and other disease.
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Patients with Parkinson’s Disease are Using Boxing Gloves to Fight Back

Boxing gyms around the world are helping patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease fight back. Parkinson’s disease is the second most common type of neurodegenerative disease affecting an estimated 7-10 million people worldwide. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle control leading to slow movement, rigidity, resting tremor and instability. As symptoms worsen it may be difficult for individuals with Parkinson’s to walk, talk and perform simple tasks.
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Osteoarthritis is a Risk Factor for Developing Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases that causes a person to have high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood, or hyperglycemia. Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. Hyperglycemia or high levels of blood sugar damage the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure and blindness.
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Why Type 2 Diabetes Increases the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. Patients with diabetes have hyperglycemia, or high levels of blood sugar, that damages the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to cardiovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure and blindness.
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Women with Asthma May Develop ACOS; The asthma and COPD overlap syndrome

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or COPD, is a medical term used to describe a group of chronic, inflammatory lung diseases including; emphysema, chronic bronchitis, refractory asthma and bronchiectasis. It is the fourth leading cause of death in the world.1 The main cause of COPD is long-term exposure to substances that irritate and damage the lungs. Long-term cigarette smoking is the biggest risk factor for developing COPD but additional risk factors include; exposure to second hand smoke, chemical fumes, dust, age and genetics. Asthma and COPD are recognized as distinctly different diseases. Asthma typically starts in childhood and is associated with allergies and eosinophils versus COPD that occurs in adults and involves neutrophils. Asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, or ACOS, describes people who have both diseases. A recent Canadian study found more than 40 percent of women with asthma will develop ACOS. Researchers in Ontario evaluated 4,051 women with asthma. The participants provided their health history and lifestyle. Through a medical database, researchers followed the health histories of the participants between 1992 and 2015. Additionally, using the participants postal code and satellite data, the research team estimated the women’s average exposure to pollution during that time. Out of the more than 4,000 participants, 1,701 women (42%) developed COPD. Risk factors for developing COPD included lower education, being overweight, living in a rural area and smoking. Other studies have shown non-smoking women have a higher rate of COPD than non-smoking men suggesting women may be more susceptible to other COPD risk factors however; men were not included in this study so no comparison can be made. Thirty-four percent of the women that developed ACOS, and 19% of women who did not develop ACOS, died during this study. One of the researchers said patients with ACOS suffer more exacerbations, are hospitalized more frequently and have a lower quality of life compared to patients with asthma or COPD alone. Patients diagnosed with COPD and ACOS are at risk of developing additional complications including:
  • Respiratory infections
  • Heart problems
  • Lung cancer
  • High blood pressure in lung arteries
  • Depression
Current treatment options provide symptomatic improvement but are not curative. Conventional therapies include; a combination of pharmaceutical drugs, lifestyle changes, oxygen and as a last resort, surgery. Stem cell therapy at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute may reduce some of they symptoms associated with COPD and may lead to a number of qualities of life improvements including:
  • Easier breathing
  • Improved lung function
  • Increased energy
  • Improved stamina
  • Reduced coughing and wheezing
  • Reduced number of infections
Stem cell therapy for patients with COPD, targets the destroyed lung tissue and cells causing the complications. At the Stem Cells Transplant Institute, the goal of stem cell therapy is to use your own healing cells to improve breathing, reduce inflammation and create an environment that is optimal for tissue repair and angiogenesis. Stem cell treatment along with lifestyle modification may help improve the symptoms of COPD. Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to:
  • Promote self-healing
  • Have potent anti-inflammatory capabilities
  • Modulate abnormal immune system responses
  • Prevent additional premature cell and tissue damage
  • Reduce scarring
  • Stimulate new blood vessel growth improving blood flow
Contact the Stem Cells Transplant Institute today to schedule your free consultation.  

Reference:

Teresa To et.al., Asthma and COPD Overlap in Women: Incidence and Risk Factors. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, online July 17, 2018.

Early Treatment for Osteoarthritis is Important

A study published in July, 2018 in Arthritis Care and Research by researchers in Norway showed patients around 40 years of age have a significantly shorter walking distance when compared to same aged individuals who do not suffer from OA. In addition, the shorter walking distance appeared to be related to arterial stiffness or stiffening of the large arteries which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness is a result of arteriosclerosis and inflammation plays a large role in both osteoarthritis and arteriosclerosis.
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Earlier Detection Could Mean Earlier Treatment for Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle control leading to bradykinesia (slow movement), rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability.  As symptoms worsen, it may be difficult to walk, talk, and perform simple tasks. Non-motor symptoms can include; anxiety, depression, psychosis, and dementia.
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What is Glutathione and How do I Pronounce it?

Glutathione, pronounced (gloota-thigh-own), is a molecule produced by your body that acts as a critical antioxidant, ridding your body of free radicals. Research has shown free radicals can damage your body’s cells and lead to aging and illness. Glutathione helps maintain cellular health, controls inflammation, and keeps the immune system functioning optimally, preventing illness. The Stem Cells Transplant Institute uses Glutathione to help maximize the efficacy of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells.
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Stem Cell Treatment: Choosing a Qualified Specialist

Your choice for regenerative medicine and stem cell treatment has the potential to change your life. Stem cell therapy can improve your quality of life by offering relief to patients suffering from chronic pain, difficult to heal injuries, and certain chronic conditions. However, all procedures have some risk, even under the safest conditions. You have to consider what can potentially go wrong and use that information to help you pick the most qualified clinic and physician.
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Type 2 Diabetes: Are you at risk?

Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. It is a common condition worldwide, but because the symptoms may present slowly or not at all, many people are not aware they have it. Once they are diagnosed, patients may still not be concerned about the disease because their symptoms are mild; however, hyperglycemia, or high levels of blood sugar, damages the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure, and blindness.
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By the Year 2030 1.2 Million Americans May be Living with Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by a progressive loss of muscle control leading to slow movements (bradykinesia), rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability. As symptoms worsen it may be difficult to walk, talk, and perform simple daily tasks. Non-motor symptoms can include; anxiety, depression, psychosis and dementia.
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