Systemic Inflammation in Your 40’s and 50’s may Lead to Frailty in Your 70’s and 80’s

Frailty is a geriatric syndrome associated with poor health outcomes. Patients suffering from frailty syndrome are at an increased risk for falls, disability, hospitalizations, chronic disease, and death. These patients are vulnerable to a large number of adverse events. Stem cell clinics like the Stem Cells Transplant Institute in Costa Rica are using stem cell therapy to treat inflammatory diseases such as frailty.

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STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION: STAY YOUNG & HEALTHY!

Dr. Leslie Mesen and the Stem Cells Transplant Institute were recently featured in Wellness Magazine, Austria’s biggest premium health magazine. The article “Stem Cell Transplantation: Stay Young & Healthy” was made available to readers in May while the printed article will be available in the June issue. For the benefit of our English and Spanish speaking readers, below is the translated article.

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Low Levels of Vitamin D May Increase your Risk of Developing Diabetes

Scientists found that people considered vitamin D deficient were at five times greater risk of developing type II diabetes. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a serious, chronic, metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and lack of insulin. Serious complications caused by type 2 diabetes include, organ damage, heart attack, stroke, blindness and kidney failure.

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Eating Breakfast Late May Increase the Risk of Obesity for Patients with Type II Diabetes

Type II diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Type II diabetes is a chronic disease that affects how glucose is metabolized; initially a person with type 2 diabetes will still produce insulin, but his or her cells no longer use the insulin correctly, resulting in spiked blood sugar levels. A person diagnosed with type II diabetes needs to carefully monitor their diet, however, a new study shows they may also need to carefully monitor when they eat.

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April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month: Large study shows concussions lead to increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

The results of a study evaluating more than 300,000 U.S. military veterans showed even a mild a concussion resulting in a loss of consciousness increases the risk of Parkinson’s disease.  Mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), commonly referred to as concussions, led to a 56% increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. The study also showed that when the brain trauma was more severe, the risk of developing Parkinson’s was even higher; for those participants that suffered from a moderate or severe brain injury the increased risk was 83%.

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April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month

CNN reports at least 700 patients have died after using Parkinson’s drug to treat disease related psychosis

On April 9, CNN reported hundreds of patients have died while taking the drug Nuplazid, a drug meant to control Parkinson’s disease psychosis. According to the CNN story, hundreds of patients have died while a significant number of other patients are not receiving any benefit from the drug.

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Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Increases Risk of Developing Other Autoimmune Diseases

Recent studies show; (1) Onset of type 1 diabetes is equally likely to occur after age 30 as prior to age 30 and, (2) the risk of developing one or more additional autoimmune diseases increases with age of onset of type 1 diabetes. The results of these studies are significant because patients that present with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30 may be misdiagnosed as having type 2 diabetes and typically do not receive insulin, the necessary treatment for type 1 diabetes. Additionally, patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30, are at an increased risk of developing one or more additional autoimmune diseases.

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The Chronic Pain from Osteoarthritis Can Lead to Depression

A group of researchers from Japan recently published the results of their study examining the effects of knee pain on depression and quality of life. Osteoarthritis can be a debilitating disease but few studies have looked at the relationship between knee pain and depression. According to the National Institute of Health, osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder in the United States affecting approximately 10% of men and 13% of women over the age of 60; impacting their quality of life and ability to care for themselves.

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12 Warning Signs of Diabetes

Each year diabetes kills approximately 80,000 people in the United States and in 2017, the American Diabetes Association estimated that 7.2 million Americans have diabetes but don’t know it. Diabetes is one of the diseases called a “silent killer” because it can develop without obvious signs so it is important to know what the early warning signs are.

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Stem Cell Therapy for MS: 5-year results from the HALT-MS clinical trial

In our March 23rd article, ”Stem Cell Transplants Could Provide Long-Term Remission for Patients with MS we shared the positive 3 year results of stem cell transplant in patients with remitting-relapsing MS. In this article, we will share with you the results from a 5 year trial sponsored by the National Institute of Health.

The 5-year results a from a trial called HALT-MS, sponsored by the National Institute of Health, were published in February, 2017, in the journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The results showed high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by a stem cell transplant stopped the disease and improved symptoms.

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April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month: 11 facts you need to know about Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of muscle control leading to bradykinesia (slow movement), rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability.  As symptoms worsen, it may be difficult to walk, talk, and perform simple tasks. Non-motor symptoms can include; anxiety, depression, psychosis, and dementia.

Dopamine is a chemical that acts as a messenger between brain cells. It plays a role in how we move, what we eat, and how we learn. The substantia nigra, a tiny strip of tissue on both sides of the base of your brain produces dopamine. When the brain cells in the substantia nigra start to die, dopamine levels drop. When the level of dopamine gets to low, you will begin to experience symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

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New Research Shows Stem Cell Therapy May Help Women with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), also called premature ovarian failure, occurs when your ovaries stop functioning normally before the age of 40. When the ovaries stop functioning normally they no longer produce sufficient amounts of estrogen and will not store and release eggs regularly. Frequently women with POI are diagnosed with premature menopause but they are not the same thing. Women with primary ovarian insufficiency will continue to have irregular periods for years and may become pregnant, although infertility is one of the symptoms of POI. Women with premature menopause stop having periods and do not have the ability to become pregnant.

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Our position regarding the alert given to Costa Rican population about stem cell treatment by the Costa Rican College of Physicians and Surgeons

A series of reports have recently appeared in electronic, national, and international media sources, citing a warning by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Costa Rica, about abuses that may be taking place in our country by unscrupulous clinics using stem cells. According to news sources, some of these clinics are offering “miracle therapies” to patients, without any clinical or scientific data to support the therapies. 

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Unique Risk Factors that Increase the Risk of Stroke in Women

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in women, and stroke kills twice as many women as breast cancer.  Stroke affects more women than men each year and the mortality is much higher for women, so it is important to understand the unique risk factors that increase a woman’s risk of stroke. As part of a special issue of the journal Stroke, investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston reviewed the risk factors for stroke that are specific to women including; hormone levels, hormone therapy, hormone birth control, pregnancy, the age of menarche and the age of menopause.1

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Does excess calcium in the brain lead to the development of Parkinson’s Disease?

Lewy bodies are abnormal accumulations of protein inside the nerve cells in the brainstem, or in the cortex, of patients with Parkinson’s disease.  Alpha-synuclein protein is one of the critical proteins, that accumulate and become toxic to neurons, playing a central role in the development of Parkinson’s Disease. In the brains of many people with Parkinson’s disease, alpha synuclein has been found to be folded the wrong way, causing them to clump together and form Lewy bodies, which block the exchange of electrical signals altering the release of Dopamine and ultimately leading to cell death.

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Could a diet rich in fish and meat help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease?

In a study published online in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers at the Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s, at the Edith Cowan School of Medicine in Perth, Australia, results showed eating a diet high in protein may prevent or delay of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.  Scientists evaluated the diets of 541 healthy volunteers and split them into one of three groups; high protein intake, moderate protein intake and low protein intake. Results showed that participants in the high protein intake group, those that consumed ~120 grams of protein a day, were less likely to have high levels of amyloid beta in their brain, reducing their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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