Stem cells news

Diabetes

Study Shows Women More Likely to Suffer from Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

A recent study, evaluating vitamin D deficiency in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), found women are at significantly greater risk than men of suffering from peripheral neuropathy. Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because it is produced by the body in response to exposure to sunlight. The symptoms of vitamin D deficiency can be similar to the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy including; numbness, tingling, chronic pain, lack of coordination and falling, muscle weakness, and changes in blood pressure. Study Design With the similarity in symptoms, researchers hypothesized vitamin d deficiency may be associated with neuropathic pain in patients with DPN. Investigators enrolled 239 patients with type 2 diabetes. The cross-sectional study enrolled patients with type 2 diabetes from the outpatient endocrinology clinic at the King Abdullah University Hospital in Jordan, between January and December 2017. Researchers measure neuropathic pain, serum vitamin D levels, fasting blood glucose and

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Diabetes

High Healthcare Costs Associated with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Research results published in Neurology; Clinical Practice, found adult patients diagnosed with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, had the highest total health care costs across all aspects of healthcare, making diabetes the most-costly health condition in the United States. Diabetes is the number one cause of peripheral neuropathy damaging nerves in the arms, hands, feet, legs, and internal organs. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects up to one-third of patients diagnosed with diabetes and is associated with a significant reduction in overall quality of life, increased anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, and difficulty walking. The purpose of the study published in May, 2019, was to “quantify healthcare resource utilization and risk of complications” in patients diagnosed painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. https://cp.neurology.org/content/early/2019/05/24/CPJ.0000000000000671 Study Design Between January 2010 and December 2015, Adult patients diagnosed with diabetes or diabetic peripheral neuropathy were identified using MarketScan. (MarketScan is a health research database that includes commercial private medical

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Diabetes

Could Stem Cells Cure Diabetes?

With proper care and treatment, diabetes is manageable, but no cure is yet available for this disease. Transforming stem cells into insulin-secreting cells may be the answer to finally curing diabetes. Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

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Dementia

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Decline

Researchers at the University of Tasmania in Australia have found a link between type 2 diabetes and cognitive decline.  Lead investigator, Michele Callisaya, and her colleagues wanted to see if there is a link between type 2 diabetes, brain atrophy and cognitive decline. Additionally, if they identified a link, they hoped to discover the possible underlying cause. Results of the study were published in the December issue of the journal Diabetologia. Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

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diabetes signs stem cells treatment
Diabetes

When do Patients Show Signs of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a global health problem affecting an estimated 346 million people worldwide and a leading cause of death. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

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Diabetes

Osteoarthritis is a Risk Factor for Developing Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases that causes a person to have high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood, or hyperglycemia. Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. Hyperglycemia or high levels of blood sugar damage the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure and blindness. Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

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Cardiovascular

Why Type 2 Diabetes Increases the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. Patients with diabetes have hyperglycemia, or high levels of blood sugar, that damages the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to cardiovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure and blindness.

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Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes: Are you at risk?

Diabetes is sometimes referred to as the “silent killer” because it can progress slowly and without warning. It is a common condition worldwide, but because the symptoms may present slowly or not at all, many people are not aware they have it. Once they are diagnosed, patients may still not be concerned about the disease because their symptoms are mild; however, hyperglycemia, or high levels of blood sugar, damages the blood vessels in the kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system leading to heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure, and blindness.

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Diabetes

Too Much Work Increases the Risk of Diabetes

Working overtime is good for the wallet but may be bad for your health. A study published in the British Medical Journal Diabetes Research and Care found that women who work 45 hours or more a week have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes when compared to women who work 35 to 40 hours.

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Diabetes

Low Levels of Vitamin D May Increase your Risk of Developing Diabetes

Scientists found that people considered vitamin D deficient were at five times greater risk of developing type II diabetes. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a serious, chronic, metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and lack of insulin. Serious complications caused by type 2 diabetes include, organ damage, heart attack, stroke, blindness and kidney failure.

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Diabetes

Eating Breakfast Late May Increase the Risk of Obesity for Patients with Type II Diabetes

Type II diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Type II diabetes is a chronic disease that affects how glucose is metabolized; initially a person with type 2 diabetes will still produce insulin, but his or her cells no longer use the insulin correctly, resulting in spiked blood sugar levels. A person diagnosed with type II diabetes needs to carefully monitor their diet, however, a new study shows they may also need to carefully monitor when they eat.

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Diabetes

Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Increases Risk of Developing Other Autoimmune Diseases

Recent studies show; (1) Onset of type 1 diabetes is equally likely to occur after age 30 as prior to age 30 and, (2) the risk of developing one or more additional autoimmune diseases increases with age of onset of type 1 diabetes. The results of these studies are significant because patients that present with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30 may be misdiagnosed as having type 2 diabetes and typically do not receive insulin, the necessary treatment for type 1 diabetes. Additionally, patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes after the age of 30, are at an increased risk of developing one or more additional autoimmune diseases.

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Diabetes

12 Warning Signs of Diabetes

Each year diabetes kills approximately 80,000 people in the United States and in 2017, the American Diabetes Association estimated that 7.2 million Americans have diabetes but don’t know it. Diabetes is one of the diseases called a “silent killer” because it can develop without obvious signs so it is important to know what the early warning signs are.

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Diabetes

Researchers show stem cell therapy to be safe and effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

Approximately 425 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. According to the World Health Organization, in 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Diabetes is a challenging disease to treat but stem cell therapy offers hope to the millions of people living with diabetes.  Stem cell research in North America has been slow to advance, but globally a large number of new studies are published each year. 

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Stem Cells & Diabetes

What is diabetes mellitus and how can stem cells be used? The global incidence of diabetes mellitus has increased dramatically over the past few years and continues to rise. The quest for curative therapies, that normalize blood sugar levels and provide independence from exogenous insulin therapies, impacts patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As a source of insulin producing cells, stem cells help us understand the disease better and hold tremendous potential for treatment. Researchers are looking for ways to diagnose people earlier, prevent their diabetes from getting worse, and to more effectively treat the disease.

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