Autologous Stem Cells

The evidence keeps growing; autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a safe and effective treatment for patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Most recently, data presented in October, 2018 at the 34th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) in Berlin, Germany, showed autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) was a safe and highly effective treatment in patients with ‘aggressive’ multiple sclerosis.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

This international study included leading researchers from five centers across the globe; 1. Sheffield Teaching Hospitals in Sheffield, UK, 2. The University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada, 3. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois, 4. Careggi University Hospital in Florence, Italy, and 5. Sheffield Medical School, The University of Sheffield in Sheffield UK. “The purpose of the study was to assess the safety and efficacy of AHSCT as a first line disease modifying treatment in patients with ‘aggressive’ MS.”1

Twenty patients from the five centers with ‘aggressive’ MS were enrolled in the study. None of the patients received disease modifying treatment for more than 3 months prior to receiving aHSCT.  Before stem cell transplantation, patients were treated with a condition regimen to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. The conditioning regimen included a chemotherapy drug combination of carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan (BEAM) plus antithymocyte globulin (ATG), cyclophosphamide with ATG or a combination of cyclophosphamide, ATG and busulphan.

Median age at diagnosis was 33 with an age range of 19-52. The median pre-treatment Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was 6.5. After a median follow up of 30 months, the median EDSS score was 2.0. The

Median age at diagnosis was 33 (19 – 52) years. Median pre-treatment EDSS score was 6.5 (1.5 – 9.5), which means patients required two walking aids to walk approximately 20 meters or 22 yards without resting. Median follow up was 30 (6 – 118) months. The median EDSS score at the last follow up was 2.0 (0 – 6.5). The higher the EDSS score, the greater the disability. The median improvement from pre-treatment to last follow up visit was 2.5 which is a statistically significant improvement. In addition, none of the patients had any clinical relapse following stem cell transplantation.

There were routine toxicities to treatment but no significant morbidities and no deaths.

On and MRI scan, three patients had a new brain or spinal cord lesion during the first follow-up visit, but no additional lesions were found during the rest of the study.

The researchers concluded “AHSCT was safe and highly effective in inducing rapid and sustained remission in this cohort and was associated with a significant improvement of patients’ level of disability. This demonstrates the potential role of AHSCT as first line therapy in ‘aggressive’ MS.” http://www.professionalabstracts.com/ectrims2018/iplanner/#/presentation/367

The Stem Cells Transplant Institute uses the patient’s own stem cells collected from the bone marrow or adipose tissue or umbilical cord stem cells from Liveyon, a biotechnology company in Lorba Linda, CA. Chemotherapy is given to wipe out the immune system and then the stem cells are infused back into the patient to reset the immune system.

Stem cell therapy, at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute, can reverse the damage to nervous system and improve the symptoms of MS, resulting in an improved quality of life.  Mesenchymal stem cells produce; 1. proteins that support the growth and survival of neurons, 2. angiogenic factors that are essential for the healing, growth, development, and maintenance of blood vessels, and 3. immunomodulatory substances that can reverse the damage to the nerves. For patients with multiple sclerosis this means, the stem cells repair the damaged areas of demyelination and grow new, healthy cells, preventing future damage and improving symptoms. Initial research evaluating the safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation to treat patients with multiple sclerosis is promising. https://stemcellstransplantinstitute.com/multiple-sclerosis/

At the Stem Cells Transplant Institute, we are committed to providing personalized service and the highest quality of care to every patient. We believe in the power of stem cell therapy and our goal is to help patients live their best life. Contact the experts at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute to see if stem cells transplantation is a viable treatment option for you.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

 

Reference:

  1. Das J., et al., The use of autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a first line disease modifying therapy in patients with ‘aggressive’ multiple sclerosis. 34th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, Oct. 10-12, Berlin, Germany, 230.
  2. https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/stem-cell-transplant-shows-promise-for-relapsing-multiple-sclerosis-patients/

 

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