Early Treatment for Osteoarthritis is Important

Early Treatment for Osteoarthritis

Early Treatment for Osteoarthritis is Important

A study published in July, 2018 in Arthritis Care and Research by researchers in Norway showed patients around 40 years of age have a significantly shorter walking distance when compared to same aged individuals who do not suffer from OA. In addition, the shorter walking distance appeared to be related to arterial stiffness or stiffening of the large arteries which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness is a result of arteriosclerosis and inflammation plays a large role in both osteoarthritis and arteriosclerosis.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

Researchers compared the 6-minute walking distance of 500 participants between the ages of 40 and 80 who reported suffering from osteoarthritis to 250 aged matched participants who did not have osteoarthritis. Clinical examinations, blood samples, and pule wave velocity were used to assess the arterial stiffness of participants. Patients in the age group 40-49 showed the greatest difference in 6-minute walking distance, walking a significantly shorter distance the aged matched group. That difference was correlated with an increase in arterial stiffness underscoring the importance of seeking early treatment for OA.

Several previous studies have shown patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis have a significantly increased risk of hospitalization and death due to cardiovascular disease but previous studies have focused on an older population. This study shows patients as young as 40 years of age may already begin to show early signs of cardiovascular disease.

The Stem Cells Transplant Institute uses autologous mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Stem cells support self-healing of the knee joint cartilage. Osteoarthritis of the knee occurs with gradual change to the immune system, cartilage is damaged, bone structure is remodeled, and a chronic inflammation of the synovium develops. Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to regulate the immune system response, inhibit inflammation, stimulate blood vessel growth, repair tissue, and stimulate self-regeneration of the cartilage.

Why patients choose stem cell treatment at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute:

  • Stem cell transplantation promotes self-healing
  • Stem cell transplantation is less invasive than surgery
  • Stem cell transplantation is a more “natural” treatment without the use of plastic or metal
  • After stem cell transplantation patients recover quicker
  • The Stem Cells Transplant Institute uses Glutathione and antioxidants to help maximize the efficacy of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells.

A stem cell transplant can reduce the symptoms of OA including; improving range of motion, reducing inflammation, reducing stiffness, and potentially delaying or eliminating the need for surgery, allowing patients to fully engage in the activities they enjoy. Contact us today to learn more about stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

 

 

References:

  1. Joseph KL, Hagen KB, Tveter AT, Magnusson K, Provan SA, Dagfinrud H. Osteoarthritis-related walking disability and arterial stiffness-results from a cross-sectional study [published online July 5, 2018].Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). doi: 10.1002/acr.23697
  2. Grindulis KA, Bhatia G, Davis R, et al Osteoarthritis and cardiovascular death. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2003;62:
  3. Wang et al.; Osteoarthritis and the risk of cardiovascular disease: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Scientific Reports, Dec. 22, 2016
  4. Rahman MM. et al., Risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with osteoarthritis: a prospective longitudinal study. Arthritis Care Re. 2013 Dec;65(12):1951-8.

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