Could a diet rich in fish and meat help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease?

diet rich in fish alzheimers

Could a diet rich in fish and meat help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease?

In a study published online in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers at the Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s, at the Edith Cowan School of Medicine in Perth, Australia, results showed eating a diet high in protein may prevent or delay of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.  Scientists evaluated the diets of 541 healthy volunteers and split them into one of three groups; high protein intake, moderate protein intake and low protein intake. Results showed that participants in the high protein intake group, those that consumed ~120 grams of protein a day, were less likely to have high levels of amyloid beta in their brain, reducing their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

Amyloid beta is a naturally occurring protein found in the body but it is also a crucial component in amyloid-beta plaques, the sticky clumps of protein fragments found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. High levels of amyloid beta are considered to be a precursor for Alzheimer’s disease. To receive the benefits of protein, the researchers recommend a person consume approximately 120 grams of protein a day; foods high in protein include fish, chicken, pork, turkey, beans, spinach, tofu, quinoa, nuts, sun-dried tomato, artichoke, peas and guava.

According the Alzheimer’s Association, the disease currently affects more than 5 million Americans and is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. By the year 2050, experts estimate the number of Americans suffering from Alzheimer’s could be as high as 16 million and while death due to heart disease has been on the decline since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease has increased by 89%.

The experts at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute in Costa Rica use autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells to treat patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Research has shown mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to; 1. Decrease Amyloid-beta plaque formation, 2. Stimulate neurogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuronal differentiation, 3. Rescue spatial learning and memory deficits, and 4. Possibly decrease inflammation by upregulating neuroprotective cytokines and decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines. The safety and efficacy results from animal models has led to the approval of six ongoing FDA trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.  If you or a loved one is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, contact the Stem Cells Transplant Institute today to discuss the benefits of stem cell therapy.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

 

References:

1.Binosha F, et al., Associations of Dietary Protein and Fiber Intake with Brain and Blood Amyloid-β. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Vol. 61, 4, pg. 1589-1598, January 23, 2018. 2. Tang Jun, How close is the stem cell cure to the Alzheimer’s disease: Future and Beyond? Neural Regen Res. 2012 Jan 5; 7(1): 66–71. 3. Thomas Duncan and Michael Valenzuela. Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and stem cell therapy. Stem Cell Research & Therapy (2017) 8:111

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