On January 28 we published an article, “Stem cell therapy found to be safe and effective for the treatment of frailty” in which we reviewed the disorder, frailty, and the potential benefit of stem cell therapy. According to a study published in 2014 the greatest risk factors for developing frailty include:

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

  • Stroke
  • Depression
  • Hearing impairment
  • Nutrition

In a more recent publication, December 2017, researchers found knee pain is also associated with the development of frailty. Frailty is a geriatric disease that increases the risk of dependency, hospitalization and death.  Weakness, slow movements, low physical activity, exhaustion and weight loss are the most common symptoms of the disease. Experts agree that frailty is potentially reversible and recommend early diagnosis. To diagnose the disease early it helps to understand what the potential risk factors are. For more than 6 years, researchers evaluated 3,053 patients, aged 45-79, from five medical centers across the United States. After adjusting for age, sex, race, education, marital status, smoking status, comorbidities, and body mass index, the results showed both unilateral knee pain (pain in one knee) and bilateral knee pain (pain in both knees) was associated with an increased risk of frailty when compared to patients with no knee pain. The investigators concluded that “health care systems should develop effective interventions directed toward these two common geriatric conditions [knee pain and frailty], both for prevention and treatment purposes.”1

Stem cell therapy at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute may help improve osteoarthritis of the knee. Stem cells support self-healing of the knee joint cartilage. Osteoarthritis of the knee occurs with gradual change to the immune system, cartilage is damaged, bone structure is remodeled, and a chronic inflammation of the synovium develops. Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to regulate the immune system response, inhibit inflammation, stimulate blood vessel growth, repair tissue, and stimulate self-regeneration of the cartilage.

Stem cell therapy may also help reverse the signs and symptoms of aging. Mesenchymal stem cells modulate the immune system, reduce inflammation and repair damaged tissue.   The anti-aging experts at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute, takes your stem cells from adipose tissue, activates those stem cell and then gives them back to you. Stem cells from adipose tissue were found to be more stable than other cells and better at cell adhesion, migration and would healing. Activated mesenchymal stem cells repair the damage to, and improve the function of organs, such as the; skin, brain, heart, liver, joints and kidney.

Stem cells have the ability to regenerate organs and tissues opening a wide spectrum of treatment possibilities for many diseases that were once considered incurable including;

Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer´s disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, knee injury, osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, and multiple sclerosis. Don’t wait; contact the professionals at the Stem Cells Transplant Institute to learn more about stem cell therapy.

Note: Despite all advances in stem cells research and the application of these therapies in many countries all over the world, stem cells therapies are not legally approved yet in San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, New York, Jacksonville, Seattle, Houston, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Miami, Beverly Hills and other US cities. However, stem cell treatments are legal in Costa Rica.

 

References:

Bindawas SM, Vennu V, Stubbs B. Longitudinal relationship between knee pain status and incident frailty: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative [published online December 1, 2017]. Pain Med. doi:10.1093/pm/pnx296
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